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This website has been fully funded and organised by Allergan, an AbbVie company. Moving Beyond Stroke and Spot The Signs have been created by Allergan, an AbbVie company, to raise awareness of the impact of muscle spasticity after stroke.

THE EFFECTS OF POST-STROKE SPASTICITY: HOW MIGHT THEY IMPACT ME?

If you, or the person you care for, are unsure about how post-stroke spasticity might impact your movement, watch this short video for more information. You should speak to a doctor or healthcare professional if you, or the person you care for, have any concerns.

AboutMovingBeyondStroke AboutMovingBeyondStroke AboutMovingBeyondStroke

Moving Beyond Stroke is a site and resource that has been developed for people living with muscle spasticity following stroke. The website has been developed by Allergan, an AbbVie company, to provide information and tools for patients, carers and family members who may be concerned about the impact of living with stroke.

What is muscle spasticity?

Spasticity is the medical term used to describe a condition when muscles contract for longer periods of time and then go into spasm. Healthcare professionals commonly refer to this as increased muscle tone or stiffness.1

People may develop spasticity as a result of a number of conditions including: following stroke, multiple sclerosis, or head or spinal cord injury.2

For people who develop muscle spasticity after a stroke this is sometimes referred to as ‘post-stroke spasticity’, or PSS.

PSS is estimated to occur in up to 43% of stroke patients.3 It can cause stiffness that affects joints or limbs, including ankles, knees, hips, elbows, shoulders and wrists.4 Over time this stiffness can change a person’s ability to walk, sit in a chair, turn over in bed or carry out their care needs, which can impact their quality of life.2

PSS can occur within a week of a stroke, or it can sometimes take longer than a year for the symptoms of PSS to start to develop,1,5 which is why it is important to be aware of the signs to look out for.

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SPOT THE SIGNS

The good news is that spasticity can be managed. It is important for patients, carers and their loved ones to be aware of the signs and symptoms to look out for. This is because early intervention, management and support can help prevent long-term complications and can help to make living with PSS more manageable.6

 There are many strategies to help people cope with PSS, and equipment that can help people carry on with their daily activities.2,6

HAVE YOU, OR THE PERSON YOU CARE FOR, RECENTLY EXPERIENCED A STROKE?

LIVING WITH PSS

Sophia, from Warrington, suffered extreme muscle spasticity in her wrists after her stroke, with muscle contractions so severe that they bent her wrist splint. Watch this video to find out more about her story.

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RESOURCES

This section contains materials that you might find helpful or of interest if you, or a loved one, are experiencing PSS.

References
  1. Stroke Association. Physical effects of stroke. https://www.stroke.org.uk/sites/default/files/user_profile/physical_effects_of_stroke.pdf. Last accessed October 2020.
  2. National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery. Spasticity Service, NHNN. https://www.uclh.nhs.uk/PandV/PIL/Patient%20information%20leaflets/Managing%20Spasticity.pdf. Last accessed October 2020.
  3. Wissel J et al. Neurology 2013;80:S13–S19.
  4. Kuo, CL., Hu, GC., International Journal of Gerontology, 2018;12:280-284.
  5. Ward, AB., Eur J Neurol, 2012;19(1):21-7.
  6. Francisco, GE, McGuire, JR., Stroke, 2012;43:3132–3136.
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